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REID HOSPITAL »  Foundation »  I am thankful 2013 »  I am thankful 2012 »  Athletic Trainers 2012

Athletic Trainers 2012

Athletic Trainers 2012

 

Ethan Frye

Ethan Frye - Centerville Athletics

Ethan Frye lives and breathes sports.  As a baseball player and quarterback of Centerville’s football team, he has learned to take wellness and safety seriously.  This has not been a quick lesson, however.  Ethan’s journey to this realization began two years ago during his sophomore year.  An awkward step and three pops led to a minor knee injury and the beginning of what would become much more.

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Scott Snodgrass

Scott Snodgrass - Hagerstown Athletics

In his second year of coaching football, Scott Snodgrass spends a lot of time with his athletes at Hagerstown High School.  Undoubtedly, students on the field will take hits, and sometimes they will get hurt.  So Scott is thankful to have athletic trainer Adam Gouker by his side.

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Clayton Harmeywe

Clayton Harmeyer - Lincoln Athletics

Lincoln athlete Clayton Harmeyer headed to the doctor to get his junior year school sports physical.  He was looking forward to another year of sports, and this formality was one step to get him on his way.

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Paige Thompson

Paige Thompson - National Trail Athletics

Senior Paige Thompson finished her junior year of basketball last winter and went straight into AAU (Amateur Athletic Union) in Springfield.  Unfortunately, her season there ended sooner than expected.

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Ashley Mosely and Chase Brookshear

Ben Claywell, Ashley Mosely and Chase Brookshear  - Northeastern Athletics

Ben Claywell, Ashley Mosely and Chase Brookshear have a lot in common.  They grew up in rural Indiana with a passion for sports.  They all dreamed of having the opportunity to represent their high school team and wearing the coveted green and gold.  And when they finally made the teams, they each faced the hurdle of an injury.  Thankfully, a Reid athletic trainer was on hand to help them.

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Trey Smith

Trey Smith - Preble Shawnee Athletics

Freshman Trey Smith had everything going for him.  He was the leading scorer for last year’s junior high basketball team.  He joined the varsity football team this fall – ranked as Ohio’s number one freshman wide receiver and number four in the nation to begin the season (MaxPreps.com). Through all this, he displayed a humble attitude, hoping to be a positive role model.  Then, things took a drastic turn.

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Wyatt Schweizer

Wyatt Schweizer - Randolph Southern Athletics

Sophomore Wyatt Schweizer is gearing up for another successful year of Rebel basketball.  But getting to this point has been a long process following a startling Spring injury.

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Titus Twine

Titus Twine - Richmond Athletics

Following in his father’s footsteps, Titus Twine began wrestling at age nine.  Participating with AAU (Amateur Athletic Union) teams and RHS, he continued to excel in his sport.  But during his freshman year, Titus faced something he never expected.

Read More

 

Coach Jennifer Martin

Coach Jennifer - Seton Athletics

Seton High School athletes play hard.  They give it their all.  They are there to have fun and win.  But, unfortunately, sometimes there are injuries.  This year, Seton joined ten other area high schools and partnered with Reid for an athletic training program – free to the school and free to the students.

Read More

 

Shade Brubaker

Shade Brubaker  - Tri-Village Athletics

Sophomore year basketball – Shade Brubaker goes for the rebound and takes a hard land on his head.  He momentarily blacks out on the court, and athletic trainer Scott Gravatt steps in.

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Jared Havens

Jarred Havens - Union County Athletics

Jarred Havens was looking forward to his freshman year of football at Union County High School.  He had played every year since first grade, and he was finally in high school.  But this season would come with a new set of challenges.

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Ethan Frye - Centerville Athletics

Ethan FryeEthan Frye lives and breathes sports.  As a baseball player and quarterback of Centerville’s football team, he has learned to take wellness and safety seriously.  This has not been a quick lesson, however.  Ethan’s journey to this realization began two years ago during his sophomore year.  An awkward step and three pops led to a minor knee injury and the beginning of what would become much more.

Just before sectionals the following year, Ethan took a hit to his bad knee during practice.  Reid athletic trainer Brooke Wagner knew something was wrong and recommended Ethan’s parents, Steve and Jan, take him to the Monday Sports Injury Clinic for an assessment.

“Brooke met us there,” Ethan said.  She wanted to hear first hand what Dr. Chad Reed recommended, so she could do proper follow-up care for Ethan.  “There was no way I was going to sit out of sectionals,” Ethan added.  Fortunately, Dr. Reed and Brooke worked together to get him back into the game quickly.

After football season ended, Ethan continued training.  He worked with a personal coach to improve his agility and skills until Super Bowl Sunday brought this training to a screeching halt.  Ethan slid across the gym floor and his knee popped again…but this time it was serious.

Initially, Dr. Karl Baird hoped Ethan had torn cartilage.  Unfortunately, his ACL was torn.  Ethan needed surgery.  According to Steve, Brooke was at the hospital the entire four and a half hours of surgery with the family, waiting for results and instructions to help Ethan’s recovery. 

With five weeks of physical therapy and Brooke’s training at the school, Ethan recovered quickly.  “It usually takes six to nine months to recover from a surgery like Ethan’s,” Jan said.  “He was cleared in four and a half months.”  Ethan and Brooke worked on agility, balance, strength and elasticity. 

“Having the athletic trainer there on site was beneficial.  We have been able to ask her questions.  She truly knows her players and has developed relationships with the kids,” Jan said.  “She takes special interest in them.”

“Brooke is there all the time.  If she thinks someone needs to sit, they sit,” Steve said.  “The coaches truly respect her.”

Now Ethan has a goal beyond high school sports.  “I want to do athletic training,” he said.  After working with Brooke over the past two years, he wants to help athletes too.  Brooke has already assisted Ethan in identifying scholarships and other information for his chosen college major. 

“Brooke has helped me in and out of sports,” Ethan said.

“It is so nice the school has her,” said Jan.

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Scott Snodgrass - Hagerstown Athletics

Scott SnodgrassIn his second year of coaching football, Scott Snodgrass spends a lot of time with his athletes at Hagerstown High School.  Undoubtedly, students on the field will take hits, and sometimes they will get hurt.  So Scott is thankful to have athletic trainer Adam Gouker by his side.

Adam is a Reid employee who works full time at Hagerstown High School to provide support for athletes and coaches.  From taping knees and ankles preventing injury to helping students with rehabilitation following injury, he helps keep students in their sport.

“It’s been a real blessing to have another set of eyes out there, and it is nice not having to worry about the injuries,” Scott said.  “The kids go straight to Adam.”

Scott says Adam is like another coach out on the field.  “He just gives us another dynamic and a way to keep the players safe.”  This year, the team suffered shoulder and collar bone injuries as well as concussions.  When injuries occur, Adam quickly assesses the students and informs the coach whether or not they are available to get back into the game. 

“He is one of the first people on the field when a player is injured,” said Scott.  “And he takes care of them once they are off the field to make sure they are safe.”  With health care knowledge, Adam knows who to push, and who not to push. 

Because the athletic training services are no charge to the school and no charge to the students, Scott said it is good for the kids.  “Anytime you can save the athletic department money, funds can be used for something else,” he said.

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Clayton Harmeyer - Lincoln Athletics

Clayton Harmeyer Lincoln athlete Clayton Harmeyer headed to the doctor to get his junior year school sports physical.  He was looking forward to another year of sports, and this formality was one step to get him on his way. 

The year before, a Reid physician noticed something in his heartbeat that was a bit concerning, but didn’t seem to be serious.  This year, when Clayton sat face-to-face with the physician, he heard a similar comment.  It was time for tests.

Working with Cardiologist Dr. John McGinty, Clayton had several tests learning he had an enlarged heart, common for athletes.  However, Dr. McGinty wanted to perform a stress test to be sure there were no underlying issues. 

“Dr. McGinty called me after hours and said Clayton’s blood pressure was through the roof,” Andrea said.  “Because of Clayton’s age, he wanted us to see a pediatrician.”  Clayton soon began medication and was monitored at Reid by pediatric cardiologist Dr. Leonard Steinberg. 

Clayton needed his blood pressure checked prior to playing sports, so every day Athletic Trainer Denny McCord would monitor Clayton’s blood pressure to see if he was in the safe range to join his team.  “Only one time all year was it low enough to practice,” Clayton said. 

“Denny was just really good through it all.  He had the bad job of telling him every day he couldn’t play,” Andrea said.  “At no point did we want to take any kind of chance.”

Although Clayton’s blood pressure was under control, he continued feeling palpitations.  Denny recommended he see his physician again, hoping everything would be okay and Clayton could return to football.  Unfortunately, this visit led to another test and a diagnosis beyond hypertension – supraventricular tachycardia.  Clayton needed a heart surgery.

Clayton was nervous about the diagnosis and upcoming procedure.  “I was worried I would never get to play again,” Clayton said.  “Denny said I would be fine - he cared.”  Following an eight-hour catheterization, Clayton’s heart was repaired.  In just two days, he was allowed to play basketball again.

“It is just a comfort knowing someone is there,” said Andrea.  “Denny has been great!” 

Clayton’s final sentiment – “Thank you.”

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Paige Thompson - National Trail Athletics

Paige Thompson Senior Paige Thompson finished her junior year of basketball last winter and went straight into AAU (Amateur Athletic Union) in Springfield.  Unfortunately, her season there ended sooner than expected. 

“I set a screen and felt something pop,” Paige said.  “I was on crutches for four days, and then I had Abby (Reid athletic trainer) look at it.  She could tell right away it was an ACL tear.”

Abby Coates is a Reid employee who works full time at National Trail to provide support for athletes and coaches.  From taping knees and ankles preventing injury to helping students with rehabilitation following injury, she helps keep students in their sport.  “I’m just really thankful to have an athletic training program,” said Athletic Director Mick Ditmer.  “Some schools do not.”

When Paige saw orthopedic physician Dr. Chad Reed, she learned her knee was too swollen for an MRI and would have to wait four weeks.  “I saw Abby every day after school,” she said.  Their focus was reducing the swelling and strengthening her leg in the process.  Soon the MRI confirmed the ACL was torn, and surgery was scheduled for Spring break. 

“After surgery, Dr. Reed came into the consultation room with pictures,” said Paige’s step-mom, Kendra.  He explained the procedure, trying to “put it in layman’s terms.”  Kendra was impressed with how quickly Dr. Reed called her back to answer questions following discharge.  “The doctor did a really good job,” said Kurt, Paige’s father. 

“Dr. Reed doesn’t baby me,” Paige said.  “He tells me exactly what I need to hear – not what I want to hear.” 

Paige continues to do rehab and work with Abby after school.  She is looking forward to an outstanding senior year before she heads to college next fall, where she hopes to continue her basketball ambitions.

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Ben Claywell, Ashley Mosely and Chase Brookshear  - Northeastern Athletics

Ben Claywell Ben Claywell, Ashley Mosely and Chase Brookshear have a lot in common.  They grew up in rural Indiana with a passion for sports.  They all dreamed of having the opportunity to represent their high school team and wearing the coveted green and gold.  And when they finally made the teams, they each faced the hurdle of an injury.  Thankfully, a Reid athletic trainer was on hand to help them.

From taping knees and ankles to prevent an injury, to helping students with rehabilitation after injury, the trainer helps keep students in their sport. 

“Obviously, it is a great service,” said athletic director Neal Adams.  “It prevents injuries, and when they do get injured, they get the help they need to return to the game.”

“If you get hurt, you can go to the trainer to see if it is serious, and your coach knows whether to let you play,” Ben added. 

Among other injuries, the boys both sustained concussions.  Because Reid performs a pre-season impact test each year, orthopedic surgeon Dr. Gregory Woods could do a follow-up test to compare the results and estimate the severity of the injury.  Then, the trainer could monitor their recovery and release them to play, without the need to take time off school and return to the doctor. 

“If there is a serious injury, the trainer will know,” said Ashley, recalling her own experience.  After rigorous cross country training, and a challenging first two meets, she knew something was wrong.  She turned to the trainer for help who let her know she needed to see a doctor.  She had a torn ligament in the bottom of her foot.  “Instead of having to go to physical therapy and take time out of school, I could just go to the trainer.”

The seniors now have another thing in common.  They are all back to their teams and wearing the green and gold jersey.  All three look forward to their winter and spring sports – injury free!

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Trey Smith - Preble Shawnee Athletics

Trey Smith Freshman Trey Smith had everything going for him.  He was the leading scorer for last year’s junior high basketball team.  He joined the varsity football team this fall – ranked as Ohio’s number one freshman wide receiver and number four in the nation to begin the season (MaxPreps.com). Through all this, he displayed a humble attitude, hoping to be a positive role model.  Then, things took a drastic turn.

Trey was running drills in practice when he took a hit, fell back and hit his head on the field.  Reid athletic trainer Kalette Hittle rushed to his side, checking his symptoms.  Trey was out of commission.

“Kalette called to let us know he had a mild concussion,” said Trey’s mother, Michele.  “A week later she did the concussion test again and slowly started adding back activities.”

Trey was able to play one game, and then started for his first high school homecoming game.  Late in the third quarter, he took another hard hit.  Kalette and Reid orthopedic surgeon Dr. Gregory Woods were immediately at his side.

“Trey had tingling in his right arm.  They were having trouble getting pulses,” Michele said.  “Dr. Woods said he would feel better if he had a scan.” 

Michele is a Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN) and her husband, Larry, is a former Emergency Medical Technician (EMT).  Other parents began asking them why they didn’t go down from the stands to check on Trey.  “I knew whatever was going on, he was safe with Kalette.  I was watching her reactions, and I completely trust her judgment.”

As a safety precaution, Trey went by helicopter to the hospital that night.  His concussion was severe, but with help and time he would recover.

“I can’t really remember much from that day,” Trey said.  “Originally, he did not remember the day before either,” Michele said. 

“So far this year, Kalette has been three for three with accurate assessments,” said athletic director Jason Crider. 

“She knows what she is doing, and everybody likes her,” said Trey.  “Even for preseason practices, she would come out to watch us and make sure everything was okay.”

Trey was out of school for a while, and Kalette continued to check on him and touch base with Michele and Larry.  Now that Trey is back, she continues regular assessments and watches from the sidelines for basketball.

Though Trey is only a freshman, he is already planning for his future, hoping to become a high school reading teacher someday.  “I want to be a role model,” he said. Some believe he already is one.

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Wyatt Schweizer - Randolph Southern Athletics

Wyatt Schweizer Sophomore Wyatt Schweizer is gearing up for another successful year of Rebel basketball.  But getting to this point has been a long process following a startling Spring injury. 

Wyatt had been working with Reid athletic trainer Theresa Wright-Reed to recover from a sprained ankle during freshman basketball season.  Through the direction of Dr. Brett Krepps, Reid orthopedic surgeon, Theresa helped Wyatt through therapy, taping his ankle and icing it as needed. 

Following the season, Wyatt began travelling with AAU (Amateur Athletic Union) basketball, playing on freshman and sophomore teams.  One Sunday in Cincinnati, things came to a crashing halt. 

“I was setting a screen for the point guard, and a kid came around him,” he said.  “We went head to head.”  Immediately, Wyatt couldn’t see.  He was dizzy.  His head was bleeding.  He was finished for the day.

Wyatt’s father made the decision to keep him out of the game and out of P.E. the following Monday.  When Tuesday came and Wyatt still had a severe headache, Ned took him to Dr. Krepps.  “The impact test was within normal range for athletes,” Ned said.  “But he pulled the plug on him playing ball, because the symptoms still showed a concussion.”

“I went back two weeks later.  I still had the same headache,” added Wyatt.  He kept going back to attempt getting cleared, but the headaches were constant.  “I had a headache as soon as I woke up to when I went to sleep.”

After a reasonable amount of time, Ned and Reid Orthopedic physician Dr. Greg Woods decided to do an MRI.  “It showed sinusitis,” Ned said.  “His sinus was busted.”

Wyatt took antibiotics and began conditioning with Theresa.  “I worked out with her two to three times per week, so I could get into shape,” he said.  “I like Theresa.”

“We are seeing an improvement over time with him being active,” Theresa said.  This year, Theresa will be travelling with the team as well as covering home games and practices.  As a result, she will be able to watch Wyatt as he increases his playing time.

“Wyatt is excited to get back into playing,” said Theresa. 

“I really like having a trainer here on site,” Ned said.  “Knowing she is here when the coaches are here, I have no fear that Wyatt will play over his limit.  Theresa provides that extra level of safety.”

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Titus Twine - Richmond Athletics

Titus Twine Following in his father’s footsteps, Titus Twine began wrestling at age nine.  Participating with AAU (Amateur Athletic Union) teams and RHS, he continued to excel in his sport.  But during his freshman year, Titus faced something he never expected.

It was the first match of the day at Logansport.  Titus faced a student from Kokomo.  “I was at the edge of the circle, and he came charging at me after the bell already rang,” he said.  His knee twisted, and he heard it pop.

“He tried to get back up, but he went right back down,” said his father, Larry.  “We tried icing it until the second match, but I was out the rest of the day,” Titus said. 

Fortunately, the trainer on site that day knew Brian Steele, Reid Athletic Trainer for Richmond High School.  “The communication they had between each other was outstanding,” Larry said.  “When we got back Brian was already there waiting for us.” 

After examining Titus’ injury, Brian knew he needed an orthopedic consult and referred him to Dr. Gregory Woods. They saw Dr. Woods that Monday, but the swelling would have to subside before he could have an MRI.  “Brian had me ice it every 15 minutes,” Titus said.  Five days later, the MRI showed a torn meniscus, ACL and a slight tear to the LCL.  He clearly needed surgery.

“We were going to go to Indy,” Larry said, “but Titus liked Dr. Woods so much we decided to stay.”

“Dr. Woods was very good at explaining things,” Titus said.  “I felt confident in his ability.”

Titus began exercises at home that night after surgery.  Three weeks later, he began a five- month rehabilitation plan with Brian at school.  “It was rough in the beginning,” Titus said.  “It was like teaching my knee to do something all over again.” 

Brian stayed in touch with Dr. Woods to discuss any new developments and to get instructions.  He gave Titus exercises, and monitored his progress.  “Brian was excellent with rehab,” Titus said. 

Now fully recovered, Titus is gearing up for another year of wrestling.  He hopes he will not need Brian’s assistance, but is at ease knowing he is close by if needed.

“The athletic training program is very important,” Titus said.  “A lot of injuries happen, and Brian is there to help.”

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Coach Jennifer - Seton Athletics

Coach Jennifer Seton High School athletes play hard.  They give it their all.  They are there to have fun and win.  But, unfortunately, sometimes there are injuries.  This year, Seton joined ten other area high schools and partnered with Reid for an athletic training program – free to the school and free to the students. 

“It has been great for me to know there is someone trained here,” said Jennifer Martin, volleyball coach.  “I feel comfortable assuring other teams we have a trained professional on hand.”  On the sidelines with the players and coaches, trainers are at all Seton home games.

“The trainers have been great in explaining services and providing necessary documents to parents,” said athletic director Trent Tremain, “especially with the new concussion laws.”  Concussions are a main concern for coaches and schools.  As athletics become more and more competitive, students are more likely to have a head injury. 

Reid conducts a pre-season concussion screening on each Seton athlete to identify a baseline.  Those records will be kept on hand for comparison if a student should sustain a concussion.

“It is good to have someone there who is knowledgeable,” said soccer coach Greg Stiens.  “When we have an injury, they are there to give the correct response.”

Jennifer says the trainers are very approachable for coaches, parents and students.  The players feel comfortable contacting the trainers on their own when needed, and one trainer made a special trip to follow up with a player the next morning. 

Greg appreciates the clinical help from the sidelines and having the proper equipment.  “If a player needs a knee or ankle wrap, the trainers are right there to do it,” he says.  “If a player is injured, they can determine whether to play them.”

All three feel confident in the expertise Reid trainers provide. “I know I’m going to have someone there who is very qualified,” said Trent. Greg added, “You know they are trained properly if they come from Reid.”

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Shade Brubaker - Tri-Village Athletics

Shade Brubaker Sophomore year basketball – Shade Brubaker goes for the rebound and takes a hard land on his head.  He momentarily blacks out on the court, and athletic trainer Scott Gravatt steps in. 

Keeping Shade calm, Scott performs a few simple tests to determine the severity of Shade’s injury.  Though there are no signs of brain or neck injury, it is obvious; Shade needs to go to the hospital. 

“Scott remains very calm and professional, which keeps the team calm,” said Shade’s mother Kelly Jones.

Shade received 11 staples in his head that night.  With Scott at the school, Shade’s care didn’t end when he went home.  The doctor cleared him to play, as long as the cut could be covered. But given the area of the injury, that was a challenge.

Scott crafted a special bandage and used a sticky residue to keep the bandage over Shade’s hair. 

“He kept checking me and cleaned my cut every day to prevent infections,” Shade said.  “Scott would always explain what he was doing and ask first.”

The next day, Shade was able to join his team for a Saturday game.  Two weeks later, the staples were removed without infection or complication.

“The sport is getting more physical,” said Kelly.  “I feel better having a trainer there.  It gives me peace of mind.”

Fast-forward to summer basketball league 2012, just before Shade’s senior year.  He is playing in a game at Centerville High School. Taking an elbow to the eye, Shade has a gash above his right eye and is rushed to Reid Hospital for five stitches. 

“Scott showed up to the school to check on me,” said Shade.  “He wanted to make sure the healing process was going well.”

“I think every school should have an athletic trainer,” Shade said.  “I really like Scott.  He is really friendly and if there is an injury, he’s there and very professional.”

“The boys need a professional opinion, because they want to keep playing when they should really get checked,” Kelly said. 

“Scott has a good relationship with all the players and coaches,” Shade said. 

Kelly added, “We are really truly blessed to have him.”

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Jarred Havens - Union County Athletics

Jared Havens Jarred Havens was looking forward to his freshman year of football at Union County High School.  He had played every year since first grade, and he was finally in high school.  But this season would come with a new set of challenges.

“We were running a linebacker drill, and I was up against one of the hardest kids,” Jarred said.  He ran and tucked the ball when he was hit in the side of his helmet.  “I was basically up in the air.”

Jarred had an immediate headache, but kept playing.  After the next hit, he knew he needed help.  He was dizzy.  The manager grabbed his helmet – partly to keep him from falling and partly to be sure he would go – and led him to Reid athletic trainer Jennifer Detweiler. 

“Right away you could tell he just wasn’t himself,” Jennifer said.  She performed a quick evaluation, asking him questions, checking his vitals and memory.  He failed.  Jennifer found Jarred’s mother, Tracy, and gave her all the information to take with them to Reid’s sports clinic the following day.  “We baseline tested all the athletes before the season began, so the doctor could compare results.”

“It was amazing how much everything went down,” said Tracy.  Physician Assistant David Comer reviewed the results, conducted a more thorough exam and told Jarred he could not play for at least a week.  “The walk-in clinic was very nice, and David was great,” Tracy said.

“It took three days for symptoms to improve,” Tracy said.  The following week, David cleared Jarred for practice, but each day he would visit Jennifer for an evaluation.  If he passed, he could progress to the next step. 

“Jen gave me her cell phone number and said if it was 3 a.m. and he had symptoms, call.  It is nice having her here – she takes care of the kids and the coaches respect her.”

Jarred believes the athletic training program protects kids from being seriously hurt.  “Without Jen, I would have stayed in practice and gotten worse,” Jarred said.

“It’s fantastic!” Tracy added.  “I trust Jen 100 percent with my son!”

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