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REID HOSPITAL »  Foundation »  I am thankful 2013 »  I am thankful 2012 »  I am thankful 2011

I am thankful 2011

I am thankful 2011

Patient

Don Smith

A typical day for Don Smith is spending time with his wife of 43 years and his dog at their country home in Greenfield. On occasion, he travels to gun shows, which is what brought him to Richmond December 12, 2009. It was a day he won't soon forget.

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Patient

STOP program: Angelica Perez – Orduno & Allison and Naedeine Stanley

The Stanley family has made a lot of positive changes since Allison (age 11) and Naedeine (age 8) enrolled in STOP, from trying new vegetables to playing tennis together.

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Patient

Margie Weller

With 62 years of marriage and nearly 50 years serving Richmond, Bob and Margie Weller grew to love their community, friends, and especially their family.

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Patient

Adam Amos & Matthew DuPre

Among the many new happenings at Reid Hospital is the Indiana University School of Medicine (IUSM) clerkship program. And among those experiencing Richmond and Reid for the first time are two students from Terre Haute, Matt DuPre and Adam Amos.

Read More

Patient

Kathy Helton

Kathy Helton spends her days at Houston Woods planning events and her evenings and weekends with her family in Liberty. At 44-years-old, she loves being with people, going to ballgames and mostly spending time with her three sons and two grandchildren.

Read More

Patient

Raymond Gipson

Although Raymond Gipson has lived in Richmond most of his life, he is the type of man that chooses to serve others. An area bricklayer, he moved to Florida for a while after the hurricane to help rebuild homes for FEMA.

Read More

Patient

Ryan Williams, RN

You might say Ryan Williams was destined to be in emergency care. His mother, sister, wife, brother-in-law and father-in-law are all firefighters, Emergency Medical Technicians (EMTs) and/or nurses.

Read More

Patient

Josh Parr

September 21, 2010 – The Centerville High School football team headed out to their home field to win another victory for the Bulldogs. Josh Parr was among the players running onto the field. The band was playing their fight song. The cheerleaders and fans were shouting at the top of their lungs. It was going to be a great night!

Read More

Patient

Faye Walls

In September of 2009, Faye Walls and her family doctor agreed it was time to proceed with a partial hysterectomy. After a meeting Dr. Richard Woodruff, gynecologist, Faye received orders for her pre-surgery tests including a chest x-ray. Much to her surprise, she would soon have a change of plans.

Read More

Patient

Brandenburg Family

Loverda Brandenburg's family has been through a lot since her oldest daughter was diagnosed with breast cancer. The road has been difficult at times, but through it all they've come together to provide support. Not to mention bake up a storm to raise money for breast cancer research.

Read More

Don Smith

Patient A typical day for Don Smith is spending time with his wife of 43 years and his dog at their country home in Greenfield. On occasion, he travels to gun shows, which is what brought him to Richmond December 12, 2009. It was a day he won't soon forget.

Don was at the Kuhlman Center at the Wayne County Fair Grounds visiting with a friend. He suddenly became dizzy and passed out, and when he woke up, he was at Reid Hospital.

The retired fire fighter had spent 32 years rescuing others, but this time, Don would be on the receiving end of the rescue. Fortunately, several people rushed to help including two off-duty Richmond fire fighters, an off-duty state trooper and a retired firefighter from Crawfordsville.

"They lost me twice during that time," Don said. "With their help and an AED, I'm here today."

"The hospital called and said there had been an incident," Don's wife, Pat, said tearfully. "I walked into his room at Reid and he was sitting up, so I didn't realize how bad it was. Then the doctor told me he had died."

Reid heart physicians, Dr. Schmidt and Dr. Han, were ready to step in as soon as Don arrived.

Through Don's time with the Indianapolis fire department, he spent a lot of time with Emergency Medical Services (EMS) and in hospitals. "I thought everything was peaches and cream there, but at Reid they treated me like a person, not a number," Don said. He and his wife appreciated the personal attention and friendliness of physicians and staff.

Nearly two years have now passed. Don is thankful each day for the available AED and those who stepped in to help during his moment of need. He has since had the pleasure of meeting each of them and offering a personal "thank you" for their part in saving his life.

"Now we can look forward to our 50th anniversary." Pat said.

"I couldn't have pre-planned it any better," Don said.

Community AED program

With the help of donors, Reid Foundation purchased and distributed 225 Automated Electronic Defibrillators (AEDs) in 2011 and 2012. Seventy-five were donated to area school systems where people, young and old, gather each day. The remainder went to non-profit organizations. This effort began with Eaton Library, Cope Environmental Center and Camp Yale in Randolph County.

We often hear stories of men, women and children who have died from a heart-related incident – many could have been saved if an AED had been available and a bystander willing to follow simple instructions used it.

For those of you who joined in this important endeavor to make AEDs available in our community - thank you. The cost of each device was negotiated at approximately $1,000 bringing the total cost of the program to $225,000.

An interesting fact...
Knowing some people are intimidated by the use of an AED, a team of experts as well as individuals with no clinical background interviewed several companies to find an AED that anyone could use. In fact, the chosen device actually talks the user through the process and will not continue to the next step until it senses the previous step has been completed. It then assesses the patient and only administers shock if needed.

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STOP program: Angelica Perez – Orduno & Allison and Naedeine Stanley

Patient Angelica Perez-Orduno
Angelica's parents were concerned when she gained 25 pounds in one year—and so was her doctor. In addition to being overweight, she was showing early warning signs of Type 2 diabetes. Her doctor recommended Stop Taking on Pounds (STOP), a 12-week class at Reid Hospital that has helped many children better understand the basics of weight management and live healthier lives.

Angelica attended the class with her mother, and realized immediately how much she had to learn. "The class taught me what kind of foods I should eat and how big my portions should be," she says. "I eat more vegetables now and way less junk food."

Although she doesn't love to exercise, Angelica definitely sees the benefits of an active lifestyle. "We exercised in class and had to do physical activity during the week," she says. "By the end, I was able to jump higher and stretch my muscles more."

Angelica has maintained most of her newfound healthy habits, and she hasn't gained any weight in 2011—a major accomplishment for this once sedentary 11-year-old. Even her doctor is impressed!

Allison and Naedeine Stanley
The Stanley family has made a lot of positive changes since Allison (age 11) and Naedeine (age 8) enrolled in STOP, from trying new vegetables to playing tennis together.

"One of my cousin's kids did the STOP program a few years ago, and I felt like it could help my daughters, too," says the girls' mother, Andrea. "For us, the issues included choosing healthy foods, eating the right amount of food and getting enough exercise."

Andrea learned a lot during the class, including how to ensure that her family gets enough nutrition from all food groups over the course of the day. She's kept the girls active through swim lessons, bike riding and tennis. "Before, if someone told me to get exercise, it was like 'no, thank you!'" Allison says. "But I found out I like riding my bike and walking around the neighborhood."

By the end of the class, both girls increased their fitness level and decreased their body mass index. Asked whether she's glad she took part in STOP, Allison responds with an emphatic yes. "I feel better about myself now," she adds. "More confident and happy."

Reid's STOP program

STOP is a physician-referred 12-week weight management program for children and adolescents ages 7-17. The purpose of STOP is to improve the physical and emotional health of the entire family. By learning more about eating right, exercising and choosing healthy lifestyle habits, children and adolescents can reach their weight management goals.

Reid Hospital Foundation provides this $45,000 program to the community free of charge. Although some insurance companies will pay a portion of the cost, most do not. We at Reid understand that habits - good or bad - begin at a young age. Our hope is to instill positive habits that will last a lifetime.

Please join us in supporting this important endeavor by making a donation to the STOP fund. Your gift will make a difference in the lives of our youth.

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Margie Weller

Patient With 62 years of marriage and nearly 50 years serving Richmond, Bob and Margie Weller grew to love their community, friends, and especially their family.

Bob retired from his position as public accountant and managing partner of George S. Olive & Company, now BKD. He served through the Chamber of Commerce and Boys and Girls Club as well as numerous other organizations and individuals. He was not a man to sit idly and let others do the work. Bob was a true gentleman.

"I don't remember any lectures or preachy advice," said his son, Rob. "He taught me quietly, by example."

In March, however, Bob knew time with his family was growing short. After courageously battling cancer for five years, he made a decision to stop treatments and go home with the care of Reid hospice.

"Hospice provided Bob with superior care," Margie said. "I did not know what to expect. It was a pleasure to find dedicated nurses with years of experience come in to help."

As the days passed, the family found comfort in the compassion and sensitivity they received from the hospice team. "I knew I needed help, and they assured me they would be here for me," Margie said. The nurses spoke with family members close by and those in other parts of the country, as requested.

"They showed Bob respect, and made him comfortable," Margie added. "They were saints – absolute angels!"

In the end, Bob told his daughter, Marcia, "I'm going to heaven tonight." She sat with him, sang and read scriptures. Then Bob went to sleep and died peacefully.

Marcia said, "The nurses were so kind. They gave us time, and they gave us hugs."

The family had the comfort of being able to say their final good-byes, as caregivers were nearby ensuring the comfort of their loved one.

Months have passed since Bob's death, but his legacy remains strong. His family reflects their last days with him fondly. They now tell others about the care Reid hospice provided.

Margie said, "I'm so grateful God sent them to me!"

Hospice
Reid Hospice serves many families just like the Wellers. A team of nurses, volunteers and a chaplain are available to ensure comfort for the patient and family. The care brings compassion and dignity in the final days of life.

This year, Reid began offering inpatient hospice care. The service affords the same care to those who are unable to take their loved one home. Sometimes this is due to space in their home for a hospital bed. Other times, a medical condition may prevent the move or a family may simply prefer to remain at the hospital. Regardless, we believe all patients deserve the best care every day of their life, and families deserve compassion.

Reid Foundation chooses to support this important service to the community. Please join us as we honor those who, like Robert Weller, have lived and served.

If hospice is important to you or someone you know, make a contribution to the hospice fund today.

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Leslie Walther

Patient Among the many new happenings at Reid Hospital is the Indiana University School of Medicine (IUSM) clerkship program. And among those experiencing Richmond and Reid for the first time are two students from Terre Haute, Matt DuPre and Adam Amos.

Matt and Adam are in their final year of medical school, which requires ten one-month "clerkships" at various hospitals around the state. Matt and Adam are two of the first students rotating through Reid as part of their lineup.

"Everyone has been very hospitable," Adam said. "Even the consults are very enthusiastic about having students around," Matt added.

Both students are family medicine majors spending their time in the emergency department with Doctors Ken Wedig and Samuel Iden.

The medical student assesses the patient first and presents his thoughts to the attending physician. Then, both the physician and student visit the patient, allowing the student to observe. If the doctor agrees with the initial assessment, they proceed with the plan to treat the patient.

"It's nice to be working one on one with the physicians," Matt said. "It better prepares us for future residency."

The feeling is mutual with the doctors. "It's an honor to be involved in this program," Dr. Wedig said. "I'm in the middle of my career, and it brings something new. I chose to work in a small community, but enjoy teaching." With the IUSM program, he is able to do both.

"Our community wins with this program," said Dr. Tom Huth, Vice President of Medical Affairs. "Bringing promising young students to Reid, gives them a taste of the opportunity to experience state-of-the-art facilities in a rural area." The possibility of recruiting and retaining physicians broadens.

"Reid offers the unique feature of having all emergency-trained physicians in the ER," said Adam. Many hospitals staff their emergency department with family medicine doctors.

In addition, Dr. Wedig said IUSM requires board certified physicians. "In a small hospital like this, most are only 40 percent board certified. In metro areas, they are about 70 percent board certified," he shared. "We are 100 percent. It speaks to the quality of Reid in general."

Matt and Adam will move on for now, but are thankful for the learning opportunity they have had at Reid. Dr. Wedig is "happy to be a team player." The patients receive additional attention and perspective. The community anxiously awaits for students to return and practice medicine in their hometown.

IU School of Medicine Fund
This fund allows a teaching program to occur in our own community. As you can see, a number of people benefit through this program. From an economic growth perspective and community health care need to Reid's current and future medical staff members, the future is promising.

If you would like to be part of this exciting new venture, please consider a donation to the IU School of Medicine Fund.

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Kathy Helton

Patient Kathy Helton spends her days at Houston Woods planning events and her evenings and weekends with her family in Liberty. At 44-years-old, she loves being with people, going to ballgames and mostly spending time with her three sons and two grandchildren.

However, life has recently led Kathy and her family through a two-year challenge – breast cancer.

In December of 2009, Kathy had her annual mammogram, which was clear. Things quickly changed, though, and in February she began to notice signs – swelling, redness and irritation – leading her back to her primary care physician, Dr. William Fisher.

After an additional mammogram and biopsy, Kathy sat in an exam room where Kathy Macdonald, R.N. shared the news she dreaded hearing. She had stage four inflammatory breast cancer, the rarest form.

Kathy was very familiar with cancer. "My husband's parents both died of cancer and my adoptive mother died of breast cancer," she said. "My mom had a positive attitude about her 15 years ago." Kathy chose to follow that lead, saying she and her husband have learned to laugh through the difficulties.

Kathy Macdonald is a Reid Breast Cancer Navigator. Her role is to walk patients through each step of the process. "My job is not only to navigate, but to educate," she said. "Kathy became educated about her disease and took an active role in her treatment."

"Kathy Macdonald explained everything to me," Kathy said. "She is a very soothing, comforting and understanding person.

During her first treatment, Kathy's husband and sons all came and sat with her. The nurses helped them through the emotional, yet meaningful, time for her. "I was more worried about them than myself," said Kathy. "I was overwhelmed that they would all come and be with me through the entire chemotherapy treatment."

Kathy underwent several rounds of treatments, both chemotherapy and radiation. During that time, Kathy Macdonald helped direct her to resources in the community and at Reid. From financial assistance, exercise regimen, bra fittings and wigs, "She was right there with me!" Kathy said. "She knows what you need before you do."

As Kathy looks to the future, she will undergo reconstructive surgery later this year. She still loves her job and supportive co-workers. She has a husband and family who "love her no matter what." And she chooses to overcome her circumstances.

Offering a bit of advice to other women who are diagnosed with breast cancer, Kathy said, "First pray. Secondly, if you need treatment, go to Richmond. Finally, laughter is the best medicine!"

Breast Cancer Navigator
When a patient receives a startling diagnosis like breast cancer, they often don't know how they will get through. Then, in walks the Reid Breast Cancer Navigator, who calmly shares the options and steps necessary to overcome the disease.

Every day, women like Kathy need a friend who will remember their name. They need someone to provide education and assist with difficult decisions. They need someone to hold their hand through a treatment.

The Reid Breast Cancer Navigator helps to set appointments, find resources, and answer questions.

"I have a friend who went through breast cancer six years ago, and she still talks about Kathy Macdonald!" Kathy said.

Reid Foundation chooses to support women in the community through the Breast Cancer Navigator program. Please consider joining us and making a donation to the cancer fund.

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Raymond Gipson

Patient Although Raymond Gipson has lived in Richmond most of his life, he is the type of man that chooses to serve others. An area bricklayer, he moved to Florida for a while after the hurricane to help rebuild homes for FEMA.

Last November, Ray found himself in a difficult situation. He had been to Reid's Emergency Department for some breathing problems where he received a breathing treatment, some medications and instructions to see a doctor if he wasn't feeling better in a few days.

Ray waited more than a few days, but he was still having trouble breathing. He knew he didn't have insurance to pay for a visit to the doctor, so he found himself with Dr. Robert Bode who volunteers at Siloam Health and Wellness Center, a free clinic in downtown Richmond. After an additional round of medications, Dr. Bode referred Ray to Dr. Dana Reihman, pulmonologist. "Dr. Reihman was very thorough. He treated me like I was his only patient," Ray said. "He ordered several tests and another breathing treatment at Reid. When I let them know I couldn't afford them, Dr. Reihman called the hospital and they helped me fill out Medicaid forms." Reid provided charity care for Ray until his Medicaid was approved.

"The nurse let me know that anything I needed would be covered and the fees waived," Ray added. "I don't know what I would've done without them. I just can't thank them enough!"

Ray soon received the news that he had lung cancer and would need 35 radiation treatments along with chemotherapy.

The radiation is now over, and Ray is finishing chemotherapy. Even after some time, he has difficulty saying the "c" word. "It's just that name is scary," he said. You see, his sister was like a mother to him, and not long ago she died of cancer - because she waited too long to seek treatment.

Ray is pushing through, determined to get well, and he has developed close relationships with the staff through the process.

"The doctors and nurses don't just talk to you," he said. "It's two sides – they listen. They take the scariness out of it."

One of the memorable moments of Ray's journey was when he finished his radiation treatments. "To celebrate, they sang me a song that they wrote…it kinda brought tears to my eyes."

From the family-style atmosphere, the friendly staff, and the help with knowing how to afford much-needed care, Ray says it is the staff that makes him want to get better.

"Every time I walk down that hallway, I am thankful"

Charity Care
Reid has always had a need to provide charity care. However, recent economic difficulties and changes in national health care policies make charity care an increasingly important focus for Reid Foundation.

People just like Ray walk through the doors every day, needing care – many choosing to compromise their care – without the ability to pay or knowledge of available resources. Reid staff are trained to assist, and if certain criteria are met, offer financial assistance.

Please consider making a donation to Reid Foundation in support of Reid Charity Care.

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Ryan Williams, RN

Patient You might say Ryan Williams was destined to be in emergency care. His mother, sister, wife, brother-in-law and father-in-law are all firefighters, Emergency Medical Technicians (EMTs) and/or nurses.

Although he was surrounded by emergency caregivers, his true calling came when he witnessed an accident at the Apple Fest in New Paris several years ago. "I was in high school and watched the helicopter land with the staff rushing to help," Ryan said. "At that moment, I knew I wanted to be a nurse."

Fifteen years later, Ryan is not only an accomplished Registered Nurse in Reid's emergency department, but much more. He received his Bachelor's Degree and became a paramedic in 2001 and a Registered Flight Nurse in 2005.

"I didn't want to leave Reid while I was training to be a flight nurse," Ryan said. "The administrative team was great to allow me to stay on as a liaison between Reid and EMS services while I was certified. Then I came back full time."

Appointed last year by Governor Mitch Daniels, Ryan serves on Indiana's state-wide trauma system development committee. According to the State Department of Health website, the goal of this system is to prevent death and disabilities for injured patients through the coordination of care.

"My career has almost become my hobby," said Ryan. "Reid has given me a chance to grow. Health care is ever-changing. For us to have the leading edge on patient care, we have to stay on top of continued education."

Ryan and his wife, Jessica, a Reid nurse practitioner, have two sons and enjoy their home in Economy. A full-time Reid emergency nurse, volunteer for Economy emergency services, part-time employee for Randolph County and Union City, and a flight nurse in Dayton…who knows what will be on Ryan's list of accomplishments next.

"It gives me a good feeling to help someone. I use the talent God has given me," Ryan said. "It's more than just a job – it's what I'm supposed to do."

Nursing Excellence
Reid values its nursing staff and understands the quality of care nurses provide is a major driver of patient outcomes. As a result, in 2010, Reid Foundation launched its Nursing Excellence fund. This fund supports programs for professional development, nursing research, or preparation of future nurses at Reid.

"We strive to provide the best care at Reid," said Vice President Kay Cartwright. "Continued education on current standards and up and coming practices and technology is the only way to maintain this level of care."

Please join this effort to promote continued excellence and learning at Reid.

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Josh Parr

Patient September 21, 2010 – The Centerville High School football team headed out to their home field to win another victory for the Bulldogs. Josh Parr was among the players running onto the field. The band was playing their fight song. The cheerleaders and fans were shouting at the top of their lungs. It was going to be a great night!

Josh's dad, Rich, was on the sidelines keeping stats like he had done all four years. His mom, Shelley, was in the stands, cheering him on like she had done all four years.

But all of that excitement and energy came to a screeching halt when Josh went down and didn't get back up.

"Once he was saying how bad it hurt, I knew it was serious," Rich said.

Reid athletic trainer Brooke Wagner rushed to his side. "I did a quick evaluation on the sideline, which didn't look good," she said. Brooke knew Josh needed to see a physician and referred him to Reid Orthopedic surgeon Dr. Gregory Woods.

Josh soon headed to surgery to repair a torn ACL and cartilage. "He also had a deep bone bruise, which is very painful and requires extra healing time," Brooke said.

Surgery was followed by several weeks of rehab at Reid. "It was a great environment to be in," Josh said. "It was relaxed and I got to know everyone, including the patients." Brooke said the goal of rehabilitation and insurance is to get a patient back to "daily living standards." This does not get an athlete back to sports. That is where the athletic trainer comes into play.

Josh is a natural-born athlete. He plays football and basketball, but his passion is baseball. Speaking with Brooke, he and his parents hoped she could get him ready for a full season of baseball for his senior year.

"I spoke with Dr. Woods to let him know that we wanted to try to get him back to sports earlier than the planned April 1 date," said Brooke. "We decided to do work hard and try, but not make any promises."

"Brooke worked a lot with him – even after hours," Shelly said.

"It was just pretty amazing," said Rich. "They were saying he would be lucky to be back by April for baseball, but he was back by February."

With Josh's diligence and hard work, he was able to play the last five games of basketball and be conditioned to start his senior baseball season strong. Playing his best defensive season ever, Josh led his team to a sectional championship.

Reid Athletic Training – a gift to the community
Reid Hospital Foundation supports area high schools through Reid's athletic training program. Schools that choose to participate each receive a free full-time athletic trainer to work with their student athletes on strength, agility, and limited rehabilitation following an injury.

These programs help student athletes like Josh recover quickly to get back to the sports they love, and offer parents a peace of mind.

"Unless you have a kid out there, you don't know how great it is," Rich said. "You've got someone there that's not going to guess."

Please consider making a donation to Reid Foundation in support of this important program.

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Faye Walls

Patient In September of 2009, Faye Walls and her family doctor agreed it was time to proceed with a partial hysterectomy. After a meeting Dr. Richard Woodruff, gynecologist, Faye received orders for her pre-surgery tests including a chest x-ray. Much to her surprise, she would soon have a change of plans.

"While waiting for the results and scheduling, I received a phone call telling me I needed to see Dr. Stephen Hornak to discuss my chest x-ray," Faye said. "He advised me that I needed a stress test, because of something he observed on the x-ray."

Unfortunately, the stress test led to a heart catheterization and the catheterization to a serious conversation with Dr. Hornak.

"I was told that my 'widow maker' and the artery next to it were almost totally closed," said Faye. She went on to say there was no warning of her condition. "I did awake, one morning, prior to the test, and had a stiff neck. I dismissed it, thinking it had gotten that way sleeping."

On October 22, Faye had double bypass surgery, performed by Dr. John Kuhn – just one day after the catheterization. Faye appreciated Dr. Kuhn's positive bedside manner. "I love him!" she said.

"I can honestly tell you, I do not remember having any pain during my entire stay at Reid," Faye added. "It seemed like (the staff) knew what I needed without me asking. They made me feel like my stay was the most important thing they had to do."

Following her surgery, Faye proceeded to the rehabilitation department where she exercised and followed a 12-week schedule for her recuperation.

"The staff at Rehab was great," Faye said. "They showed, in their professionalism, that they were concerned for my total recovery."

Nearly 19 months after Faye and her family physician made the decision to proceed with a hysterectomy, she was strong enough to have the surgery.

Sharing that her brother and sister had both died at a young age from heart attacks, Faye is thankful to the doctors and staff at Reid for catching her heart problems in time.

"I'm proud to have Reid in my community!"

Where the need is greatest
There are a number of needs at Reid ranging from heart and rehabilitation to cutting-edge equipment or hospice. Many donors want Reid Foundation to make the decision on where the need is greatest at a particular time. Therefore, they choose to donate to this fund, knowing the board of directors upholds an ethical commitment to their donors.

Patients like Faye, benefit from educated staff and comfortable facilities. Others need charity care or transportation assistance to their cancer treatments. The Where the need is greatest fund provides for all these needs.

Please consider making an unrestricted donation to Reid Foundation.

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Brandenburg Family

Patient Loverda Brandenburg's family has been through a lot since her oldest daughter was diagnosed with breast cancer. The road has been difficult at times, but through it all they've come together to provide support. Not to mention bake up a storm to raise money for breast cancer research.

The journey began with Donna's diagnosis in 2007. After a year of intense treatment at a hospital near her home in Kentucky, she was declared cancer free. But two years later, Loverda, who lives in Connersville with her husband of 53 years, discovered a lump in her breast. "Thankfully, it was slow-growing and we found it early," says Loverda. "I had a mastectomy and then about six months of chemotherapy at Reid Hospital. Everyone at Reid was so good to me. If I was having a bad day, my nurse, Tammy Anderson, would give me a hug and sit with me and do all she could to keep my spirits up."

Loverda had her last chemo treatment in November 2009. That same day, another daughter, Kim Chapman, was diagnosed with breast cancer, too. Kim's was considered a more serious case. Eventually, she underwent a double mastectomy and a year of chemotherapy at Reid.

Kim says that the support she received from the staff at Reid made a big difference. "My cancer navigator, Kathy Macdonald, went above and beyond to help me, and every time I came to Reid for chemo she stopped by to visit," recalls Kim, a wife and a mother of two who lives in Connersville. "The entire staff felt like they just couldn't do enough for me. On my last day of treatment they even gave me a breast cancer survivor pin."

Kim remains under the close supervision of her doctor. While the last few years have been difficult, she and her sisters and mom have found a creative and productive outlet.

"We bake all kinds of goodies and then one of my daughters, Angela, sells them at her beauty shop in Troy," says Loverda. "Last year, we raised about $2,000 for breast cancer research — that's a lot of fudge, peanut brittle and buckeyes! My daughters and granddaughters help with the baking, and some have even done fundraisers on their own. For instance, last spring some of them participated in a 5K Run/Walk for the Cure in Tipp City."

Loverda says that breast cancer has brought her entire family closer together. "We're right there for each other through everything," she says. "I'm very thankful to have such great kids."

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The material presented on this Planned Giving website is not offered as legal or tax advice.

Make a gift

Make a donation to Reid Hospital Foundation in support of important services, such as hospice, the athletic training program or community benefit mammograms.

Athletic Trainer Program

Reid provides area high schools with free athletic trainers. Read about them here.

 

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