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REID HOSPITAL »  Foundation »  Grant Giving

Grant Giving

Grant Giving

As a supporting foundation, Reid Foundation makes grants only to Reid Hospital.  From community services and charity care to equipment, we are able to make a difference in the health of our community only through the generous philanthropy of our donors.

During its history, Reid Foundation has granted an aggregate of $59.2 million to Reid Hospital & Health Care Services. In 2011, Reid Foundation approved 25 grants for an aggregate of $797,941 to support programs and services provided by Reid Hospital & Health Care Services.

View the full list.

Patient

Community AED Program

With the help of donors, Reid Foundation is committed to purchasing and distributing 225 Automated Electronic Defibrillators (AEDs) by the end of 2012. Seventy-five have already been donated to area school systems where people, young and old, gather each day. The remainder will go to non-profit organizations. This effort began with Eaton Library, Cope Environmental Center and Camp Yale in Randolph County.

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Patient

Stop Taking On Pounds (STOP)

STOP is a physician-referred 12-week weight management program for children and adolescents ages 7-17. The purpose of STOP is to improve the physical and emotional health of the entire family. By learning more about eating right, exercising and choosing healthy lifestyle habits, children and adolescents can reach their weight management goals.

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Patient

Hospice

Reid Hospice serves many families just like the Wellers. A team of nurses, volunteers and a chaplain are available to ensure comfort for the patient and family. The care brings compassion and dignity in the final days of life.

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Community Benefit Mammogram Program

Reid Hospital Foundation provides mammography screenings for women in our community who are unable to pay. If you would like to help ensure that all women have access to this important service, please consider a donation to the Cancer Fund.

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Patient

Free High School Athletic Trainers

Reid Hospital Foundation supports area high schools through Reid's athletic training program. Schools that choose to participate each receive a free full-time athletic trainer to work with their student athletes on strength, agility, and limited rehabilitation following an injury.

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Mother Baby Care - Be Our Guest

Reid Foundation is pleased to support the program that provided Leslie with a complimentary room during her premature baby's hospital stay.  We understand that special circumstances sometimes call for extra-special care.  At times, parents or family members need to be near their child on the Mother/Baby floor. 

Read More

 

Community AED Program

Patient

With the help of donors, Reid Foundation purchased and distributed 225 Automated Electronic Defibrillators (AEDs) in 2011 and 2012. Seventy-five were donated to area school systems where people, young and old, gather each day. The remainder went to non-profit organizations. This effort began with Eaton Library, Cope Environmental Center and Camp Yale in Randolph County.

We often hear stories of men, women and children who have died from a heart-related incident – many could have been saved if an AED had been available and a bystander willing to follow simple instructions used it.

For those of you who joined in this important endeavor to make AEDs available in our community - thank you. The cost of each device was negotiated at approximately $1,000 bringing the total cost of the program to $225,000.

An interesting fact...
Knowing some people are intimidated by the use of an AED, a team of experts as well as individuals with no clinical background interviewed several companies to find an AED that anyone could use. In fact, the chosen device actually talks the user through the process and will not continue to the next step until it senses the previous step has been completed. It then assesses the patient and only administers shock if needed.

Don Smith

A typical day for Don Smith is spending time with his wife of 43 years and his dog at their country home in Greenfield. On occasion, he travels to gun shows, which is what brought him to Richmond December 12, 2009. It was a day he won't soon forget.

Don was at the Kuhlman Center at the Wayne County Fair Grounds visiting with a friend. He suddenly became dizzy and passed out, and when he woke up, he was at Reid Hospital.

The retired fire fighter had spent 32 years rescuing others, but this time, Don would be on the receiving end of the rescue. Fortunately, several people rushed to help including two off-duty Richmond fire fighters, an off-duty state trooper and a retired firefighter from Crawfordsville.

"They lost me twice during that time," Don said. "With their help and an AED, I'm here today."

"The hospital called and said there had been an incident," Don's wife, Pat, said tearfully. "I walked into his room at Reid and he was sitting up, so I didn't realize how bad it was. Then the doctor told me he had died."

Reid heart physicians, Dr. Schmidt and Dr. Han, were ready to step in as soon as Don arrived.

Through Don's time with the Indianapolis fire department, he spent a lot of time with Emergency Medical Services (EMS) and in hospitals. "I thought everything was peaches and cream there, but at Reid they treated me like a person, not a number," Don said. He and his wife appreciated the personal attention and friendliness of physicians and staff.

Nearly two years have now passed. Don is thankful each day for the available AED and those who stepped in to help during his moment of need. He has since had the pleasure of meeting each of them and offering a personal "thank you" for their part in saving his life.

"Now we can look forward to our 50th anniversary." Pat said.

"I couldn't have pre-planned it any better," Don said.

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STOP program:

Patient STOP is a physician-referred 12-week weight management program for children and adolescents ages 7-17. The purpose of STOP is to improve the physical and emotional health of the entire family. By learning more about eating right, exercising and choosing healthy lifestyle habits, children and adolescents can reach their weight management goals.

Reid Hospital Foundation provides this $45,000 program to the community free of charge. Although some insurance companies will pay a portion of the cost, most do not. We at Reid understand that habits - good or bad - begin at a young age. Our hope is to instill positive habits that will last a lifetime.

Please join us in supporting this important endeavor by making a donation to the STOP fund. Your gift will make a difference in the lives of our youth.

Angelica Perez-Orduno

Angelica's parents were concerned when she gained 25 pounds in one year—and so was her doctor. In addition to being overweight, she was showing early warning signs of Type 2 diabetes. Her doctor recommended Stop Taking on Pounds (STOP), a 12-week class at Reid Hospital that has helped many children better understand the basics of weight management and live healthier lives.

Angelica attended the class with her mother, and realized immediately how much she had to learn. "The class taught me what kind of foods I should eat and how big my portions should be," she says. "I eat more vegetables now and way less junk food."

Although she doesn't love to exercise, Angelica definitely sees the benefits of an active lifestyle. "We exercised in class and had to do physical activity during the week," she says. "By the end, I was able to jump higher and stretch my muscles more."

Angelica has maintained most of her newfound healthy habits, and she hasn't gained any weight in 2011—a major accomplishment for this once sedentary 11-year-old. Even her doctor is impressed!

Allison and Naedeine Stanley

The Stanley family has made a lot of positive changes since Allison (age 11) and Naedeine (age 8) enrolled in STOP, from trying new vegetables to playing tennis together.

"One of my cousin's kids did the STOP program a few years ago, and I felt like it could help my daughters, too," says the girls' mother, Andrea. "For us, the issues included choosing healthy foods, eating the right amount of food and getting enough exercise."

Andrea learned a lot during the class, including how to ensure that her family gets enough nutrition from all food groups over the course of the day. She's kept the girls active through swim lessons, bike riding and tennis. "Before, if someone told me to get exercise, it was like 'no, thank you!'" Allison says. "But I found out I like riding my bike and walking around the neighborhood."

By the end of the class, both girls increased their fitness level and decreased their body mass index. Asked whether she's glad she took part in STOP, Allison responds with an emphatic yes. "I feel better about myself now," she adds. "More confident and happy."

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Hospice

Patient Reid Hospice serves many families just like the Wellers. A team of nurses, volunteers and a chaplain are available to ensure comfort for the patient and family. The care brings compassion and dignity in the final days of life.

This year, Reid began offering inpatient hospice care. The service affords the same care to those who are unable to take their loved one home. Sometimes this is due to space in their home for a hospital bed. Other times, a medical condition may prevent the move or a family may simply prefer to remain at the hospital. Regardless, we believe all patients deserve the best care every day of their life, and families deserve compassion.

Reid Foundation chooses to support this important service to the community. Please join us as we honor those who, like Robert Weller, have lived and served.

If hospice is important to you or someone you know, make a contribution to the hospice fund today.

Margie Weller

With 62 years of marriage and nearly 50 years serving Richmond, Bob and Margie Weller grew to love their community, friends, and especially their family.

Bob retired from his position as public accountant and managing partner of George S. Olive & Company, now BKD. He served through the Chamber of Commerce and Boys and Girls Club as well as numerous other organizations and individuals. He was not a man to sit idly and let others do the work. Bob was a true gentleman.

"I don't remember any lectures or preachy advice," said his son, Rob. "He taught me quietly, by example."

In March, however, Bob knew time with his family was growing short. After courageously battling cancer for five years, he made a decision to stop treatments and go home with the care of Reid hospice.

"Hospice provided Bob with superior care," Margie said. "I did not know what to expect. It was a pleasure to find dedicated nurses with years of experience come in to help."

As the days passed, the family found comfort in the compassion and sensitivity they received from the hospice team. "I knew I needed help, and they assured me they would be here for me," Margie said. The nurses spoke with family members close by and those in other parts of the country, as requested.

"They showed Bob respect, and made him comfortable," Margie added. "They were saints – absolute angels!"

In the end, Bob told his daughter, Marcia, "I'm going to heaven tonight." She sat with him, sang and read scriptures. Then Bob went to sleep and died peacefully.

Marcia said, "The nurses were so kind. They gave us time, and they gave us hugs."

The family had the comfort of being able to say their final good-byes, as caregivers were nearby ensuring the comfort of their loved one.

Months have passed since Bob's death, but his legacy remains strong. His family reflects their last days with him fondly. They now tell others about the care Reid hospice provided.

Margie said, "I'm so grateful God sent them to me!"

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Community Benefit Mammogram Program

Reid sees approximately 85 patients per year with breast cancer. Some of these patients, like Ellen, find the cancer themselves through self-examination without the assistance of a digital mammogram. For others, however, constraints have made that choice for them as regular exams are not affordable.

"In the last week, I have seen two women with huge tumors, because they didn't think they could afford mammograms," said Kathy Macdonald, RN. "It's important for women to discuss financial need with their physician who can refer them to Reid's mammography program."

Reid Hospital Foundation provides mammography screenings for women in our community who are unable to pay. If you would like to help ensure that all women have access to this important service, please consider a donation to the Cancer Fund.

"The difference is catching something early that is treatable."

Community Benefit Mammograms. To make a secure online donation to this fund, click here.

Ellen Cramer

Just a year ago, life was amazing for Ellen Crammer. She and her husband Tim along with their two young sons were living in Eaton, Ohio and enjoying life. She was a typical "soccer mom"- always on the go with her family's activities.

Although Ellen kept a busy schedule, she was extremely vigilant in her annual exams, knowing that breast cancer ran in her family. Last year was no different. Ellen visited her physician, but just a month later, she found a lump in her breast.

"As soon as I found a lump, I knew exactly what I needed to do," Ellen said. She called her physician and proceeded with tests ultimately leading to surgery. While the diagnosis was only stage one, her physicians chose to treat the cancer aggressively due to her family history and age. "I have a lot to live for - I need to be here."

Dr. Tom Grayson was a "phenomenal" surgeon who also took time to bond with Tim. Ellen was impressed that the Reid staff cared enough to match her with physicians who had a similar personality. "I've got to have someone who can joke with me!" For Ellen, Dr. Qin, oncologist, fit that description.

After surgery it was time for Ellen to begin chemotherapy. This was the most difficult moment for her. One of the nurses, Kathy Macdonald, sat with her the first day and held her hand the whole way through. "She called me her special patient," Ellen said. Kathy became a resource, not only for Ellen, but also for her husband who even called to ask questions at times. Ellen added, "It was scary, but they told me that I would get through it. Kathy reminded me that it's not a death sentence."

Ellen continued her regular schedule as much as possible - going to the gym and coaching - saying she was not about to quit. Tim helped by cooking or bringing home dinner and the family helped her laugh. "When my hair fell out my son Tyler wanted to see. Then he said 'Well, now it doesn't take as long to get ready!'"

The process cultivated many new friendships at Reid Hospital. "Their sense of humor is amazing," said Ellen. "The rapport they develop is amazing!" Though some people suggested she drive to Cincinnati for her care, the couple let them know, "You don't have to drive to Cincinnati - Reid has the same stuff right here at home. Driving would have been a nightmare."

Now, Ellen is at the next stage in the process, only needing one treatment per week. Her determination gave her the strength to run a 5K race with Tim in June. "I'm stronger than I thought I was - I can still do it!" she exclaimed.

Ellen's perspective has changed over the past year. She no longer worries about having a perfectly clean home or over spilt milk. She is simply happy to be spending her days with her family.

"It worked!"

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Free High School Athletic Trainers

Patient

Reid Athletic Training – a gift to the community
Reid Hospital Foundation supports area high schools through Reid's athletic training program. Schools that choose to participate each receive a free full-time athletic trainer to work with their student athletes on strength, agility, and limited rehabilitation following an injury.

These programs help student athletes like Josh recover quickly to get back to the sports they love, and offer parents a peace of mind.

"Unless you have a kid out there, you don't know how great it is," Rich said. "You've got someone there that's not going to guess."

Please consider making a donation to Reid Foundation in support of this important program.

Josh Parr

September 21, 2010 – The Centerville High School football team headed out to their home field to win another victory for the Bulldogs. Josh Parr was among the players running onto the field. The band was playing their fight song. The cheerleaders and fans were shouting at the top of their lungs. It was going to be a great night!

Josh's dad, Rich, was on the sidelines keeping stats like he had done all four years. His mom, Shelley, was in the stands, cheering him on like she had done all four years.

But all of that excitement and energy came to a screeching halt when Josh went down and didn't get back up.

"Once he was saying how bad it hurt, I knew it was serious," Rich said.

Reid athletic trainer Brooke Wagner rushed to his side. "I did a quick evaluation on the sideline, which didn't look good," she said. Brooke knew Josh needed to see a physician and referred him to Reid Orthopedic surgeon Dr. Gregory Woods.

Josh soon headed to surgery to repair a torn ACL and cartilage. "He also had a deep bone bruise, which is very painful and requires extra healing time," Brooke said.

Surgery was followed by several weeks of rehab at Reid. "It was a great environment to be in," Josh said. "It was relaxed and I got to know everyone, including the patients." Brooke said the goal of rehabilitation and insurance is to get a patient back to "daily living standards." This does not get an athlete back to sports. That is where the athletic trainer comes into play.

Josh is a natural-born athlete. He plays football and basketball, but his passion is baseball. Speaking with Brooke, he and his parents hoped she could get him ready for a full season of baseball for his senior year.

"I spoke with Dr. Woods to let him know that we wanted to try to get him back to sports earlier than the planned April 1 date," said Brooke. "We decided to do work hard and try, but not make any promises."

"Brooke worked a lot with him – even after hours," Shelly said.

"It was just pretty amazing," said Rich. "They were saying he would be lucky to be back by April for baseball, but he was back by February."

With Josh's diligence and hard work, he was able to play the last five games of basketball and be conditioned to start his senior baseball season strong. Playing his best defensive season ever, Josh led his team to a sectional championship.

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Mother Baby Care - Be Our Guest

Reid Foundation is pleased to support the program that provided Leslie Walther with a complimentary room during her premature baby's hospital stay.  We understand that special circumstances sometimes call for extra-special care.  At times, parents or family members need to be near their child on the Mother/Baby floor.   

Please help other families like the Walthers by donating to our Mother/Baby fund.  

To make a secure online donation to this fund, click here

Leslie Walther

Leslie Walther learned everything there was to know about Reid Mother/Baby throughout her 87 day stay. That stay made a permanent imprint on the lives of her and her young family.

Complications during pregnancy were not new for Leslie. She had experienced mild challenges while pregnant with each of her three daughters. However, this time things were different and the risk was far worse for both Leslie and her baby, so on September 15, 2008 Dr. Joseph Smith admitted her - and the hospital became her "home" for nearly three months.

Fortunately, Leslie and her husband Andy had a strong support group through their family and church. "It is one thing to believe in God and His love," Leslie said. "It is another to have that love acted and lived out. Not one day passed where I ever felt alone."

Leslie and Andy quickly established relationships with the nurses, who became their family. The little things made a big difference, like how the nurses came in and moved her to another room so she could look out a different window or how they took her on a daily wheelchair ride. "They all had different personalities - one was a motherly figure, some were funny - they were all great!"

"Dr. Black was my cheerleader. He would come by and tell me to hang in there," said Leslie. "Dr. Bode would check in on me once a week and Dr. Smith was amazing!"

Following numerous long days, some good and others difficult, Thanksgiving Day arrived. Leslie's water broke and her baby boy would soon be welcomed into the family full of girls. As happy as Leslie should have been at that moment, she knew that her baby was still eight weeks early.

Since she had been lying in bed for months, Leslie's epidural was proving to be difficult. "I remember saying, 'let's just all stop and pray,' and the nurses took turns praying out loud," she recalled. In a short while, Dr. Smith delivered a strong four pound baby boy, Eli. Though Dr. Black anticipated sending Eli to Indianapolis, he was able to keep him at Reid and close to home.

Leslie was soon discharged from the hospital, but throughout the next three weeks she needed to be close to her baby, so through the Be Our Guest program, Reid allowed her to stay in a room at no charge. "I felt more like it was an apartment than a hospital," she said. "I even had a Christmas tree in my room!"

Now, nearly two years later, Andy and Leslie have a beautiful family and Eli is healthy and strong. Leslie missed a lot of special moments while she was in the hospital - theatre practices, soccer, 4-H, a birthday party, tucking her kids into bed, and her traditional Christmas cookie party - but in the end it was worth it. "I would do anything for my kids," Leslie added. "We are so blessed!"

Leslie received an amazing gift on that Thanksgiving Day. For that priceless gift, she is thankful.

Leslie shared her story with her church family on the 29th of November nearly a year after her son Eli was born.  Click here to read it.

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Benefactors of these grants include:

Join us as we further support programs for Reid Hospital this year.  Make an online donation or learn more about planned giving.

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I am thankful

Patients and families tell their personal stories of how Reid impacted their lives, and why they are thankful.

Athletic Trainer Program

Reid provides area high schools with free athletic trainers. Read about them here.

Make a gift

Make a donation to Reid Hospital Foundation in support of important services, such as hospice, the athletic training program or community benefit mammograms.

 

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